2014 Changes to RCW 70.02.010

Interesting news flash: it looks like the transition to electronic medical records is beginning to pay off, monetarily.

Effective 07/01/2014, “reasonable fees” will be lowered to $0.65 pp for the first 30 pages and to $0.50 pp for any pages thereafter.  (note – this new rate is down from $1.04 pp for the first 30 pages, and $0.79 pp for all pages thereafter.)  Additionally, the maximum clerical fee a provider may charge will be reduced from $23.00 to $15.00.

“These amounts shall be adjusted biennially in accordance with changes in the consumer price index, all consumers, for Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan statistical area as determined by the secretary of health.”

To see the new bill, click here: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/documents/billdocs/2013-14/Pdf/Bills/Session%20Laws/House/1679-S.SL.pdf

MEDRECS: Mass Tort Litigation Update

In light of the recent government shutdown and partial lapse in funding for the CDC and FDA, we thought it beneficial to post a reminder about ongoing health alerts as well as  mass litigation proceedings we track.  As a premier medical record retrieval provider, MEDRECS routinely monitors food safety announcements and other warnings published by the CDC.  We often find ourselves gathering records for parties both pre-litigation and during litigation.  

One current outbreak being monitored is cyclosporiasis, a parasite that causes intestinal infections.  Public health officials allege that this parasite can be traced back to a salad mix produced by Taylor Farms de Mexico and resold in restaurants throughout the southern United States, Iowa and Nebraska.  There have been over 600 cases reported in 25 states, resulting in 45 hospitalizations.  Fortunately, no deaths have been reported.  The widespread nature of the outbreak suggests that not all cases of the parasite are related to each other or can be traced to a common source.  An investigation is ongoing.  Despite this outbreak, the CDC encourages everyone to continue eating vegetables and leafy greens as part of a healthy and balanced diet.  

At MEDRECS, we also monitor mass tort litigation proceedings.  SSRI litigation (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors), connecting SSRIs to birth defects, has been ongoing for several years now.  In 2010, GlaxoSmithKline, maker of the SSRI Paxil, agreed to settle over 800 lawsuits for over $1 billion.  Now, SSRI litigation appears to be heating up again.  Over the summer a new lawsuit appeared in Pennsylvania alleging a connection between birth defects and the use of the SSRI Zoloft during pregnancy.  Hundreds of similar federal cases from around the country could join the multi-district litigation which is set in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.  We will be tracking the development of these cases.

When your law firm, company, or governemnt agency finds itself involved in a mass tort proceeding, you can count on MEDRECS as your medical records partner. Our experience and success on large volume high-profile cases is unmatched and our turnaround time for production of records is industry best.  We have worked for the pharamceautical industry, government, healthcare industry, and for parties to numerous food-bourne illness lawsuits, gathering thousands of medical records under strict deadlines.   

Medical record retrieval is simultaneously one of the most important and most cumbersome and confounding aspects of mass litigation. Coordinating, tracking, and managing the complex job of mass record retrieval on these cases can be quite painstaking indeed.  For this reason, law firms, insurance companies, class-action administrators, and government agencies involved in litigation greatly benefit from the outsourcing of record retrieval.

For any questions about MEDRECS or this article, please email contact@medrecs.com 

HIPAA tightens its grip…

In the ever-stricter world of protected health information (PHI) and HIPAA compliance, nothing can be left to chance.  Healthcare facilities are no longer interested in inferring anything from the authorizing documents.  All requests must be explicit and direct.   Interpretation is out of the question: if there is even the slightest ambiguity on the stipulation, authorization, or subpoena nowadays, the request will likely result in a rejection.  This level of scrutiny is vastly more stringent than it was even one or two years ago.  Here are a couple important tips to remember:

If you require billing records from a particular organization, you must (1) determine where the billing is done and (2) include the specific billing department’s name and location on the stipulation/authorization.  Many hospital billing departments are now off-site and/or outsourced.  This is true for hospitals such as University of Washington and Harborview Medical Center.  In the past, it was sufficient to state on the stipulation that you require medical records and billing records from University of Washington Medical Center, or Harborview Medical Center.  Now, if you require billings in addition to the medical records, you must list the billing departments separately from the medical records departments.  So for Harborview, you must indicate “Association of University Physicians” billings (and include the address), as well as “Hospital Collections” billings.  Furthermore, you must indicate whether you seek billings generated by a UWMC Doctor or department, or a Harborview Doctor.  Yes, this is much more detailed than it was a year ago.  But it is useful to be aware of these nuances in advance as requests will be processed more quickly and achieve a higher level of success if copious information is provided at the outset.  If you have any questions about this, please contact MEDRECS.  If you are unsure of the exact wording or address for a billing facility, please contact MEDRECS.  Note – citing incorrect address, name, or facility information on a stipulation may result in a rejection from the facility.  Therefore, it is advisable to cross-check all information with MEDRECS before proceeding.

Enhanced by Zemanta

MEDRECS – Group Health Authorization Form

In the interest of thoroughness and stringent commitment to the confidentiality of patient health information, Group Health all but requires the use of their own particular authorization form in order to release protected health information (PHI).  If you attempt to request records from Group Health with something other than the Group Health Legal Release Form, your chances of gaining compliance to your request are rare indeed.  For this reason, it is highly recommended that you utilize the Group Health Legal Release Form for any medical records requests made to Group Health.  The Group Health form is updated periodically and MEDRECS keeps a keen eye out for any updates to the form to ensure that the forms we provide access to contain all the most recent verbiage.  The most recent Group Health form includes authorization language for sensitive information.  This form, and dozens of other facility-specific authorization forms, can be found in a reliable and up-to-date format on MEDRECS website.

Enhanced by Zemanta